BassWestUSA - July/August, 2009, Page 69

I always – there are no exceptions – place a Peter T Force Bead between the weight and the hook. The sound that’s generated when the weight bangs into the bead is extraordinary. There’s something to the magnetic field around those beads, too, although I’m at a loss to explain why.

admit it’s cool. But, in the real-world there are better options.) I always use tungsten for my sinker. There’s nothing available at the present time that compares to it when it comes to feel, sensitivity and sound. My preference is for Tru-Tungsten Denny Brauer Profes- sional Flippin’ Weight in 3/8 or 1/2- ounce sizes, depending upon the depth of the wa- ter and the strength of the wind. I always choose either blood red or wa- termelon seed for my color. They seem to out-produce all the other colors combined. And, I always – there are no excep- tions – place a Peter T Force Bead between the weight and the hook. The sound that’s generated when the weight bangs into the bead is extraordinary. There’s something to the magnetic field around those beads, too, although I’m at a loss to explain why. When it comes to line there’s only one choice for me when I’m worm fishing – flu- orocarbon. It’s strong enough and sensitive enough to allow me to use lighter weights like 10 and 12-pound-test for most of my fishing. My preference is Vicious. While we’re talking about line let me offer a thought or two about what you should think about when choosing a line. First and foremost is reliability. Next is weight. Always use the lightest line you can get away with. You’ll always get more bites with lighter line than you will with heavy line. And, if you use a quality prod- uct breakage will not be an issue. Besides, bass that are hooked with a Texas rigged worm aren’t that hard to land anyway. They almost always make a short run right to the top for a spectacular jump

before they go back down again. Keep ten- sion on the fish, don’t try to overpower him, and you’ll be fine, especially if you’re using the right rod. The right rod means a 7 foot, 6 inch American Rodsmiths Marty Stone Team Series. It was origi- nally designed for light line flipping, but it’s absolutely perfect for worm fishing. It offers a sensitive tip and a strong backbone. The tip will help give you some play with fluorocarbon line. The backbone will help you con- trol the big ones. I control ev- erything with a Browning Midas reel with a 6.4:1 gear ratio. It’s fast enough to bring my bait in for an- other cast and slow enough so that I don’t get ahead of myself when I’m fishing the bait. If you have the right equipment and rigging catch- ing the fish is easy, or at least easier. Now, let’s be clear. I don’t have any

secret spots or never before revealed tricks for success. Mostly, I fish a Texas rigged worm in the same summer places that ev- eryone else fishes – ledges, drops, chan- nels, stumps, laydowns, boulders, riprap and anything else I can find. In most parts of the country in the summertime I’m most interested in plac- es under 8-14 feet of water. In some lakes they’ll move shallow early and late in the day to feed, or when the weather is dark and overcast. That’s when I head towards skinny water. In other venues – mostly those with gin clear water – they’ll hold as deep as 40 feet, sometimes much deeper than that. That’s when I get down to their level. Regardless, if you adjust your weight you can fish any depth efficiently with a Texas rigged worm. Use a lighter weight for shallower applications and a heavier weight for deeper applications. It’s really as simple as that. Give this old bait a fresh look this year. You see, bass don’t go to school and they don’t learn much from one another. So, if no one else is fishing a plastic worm – and hasn’t fished one in years – the lure is new to the bass. Sometimes that’s all it takes to be successful. BW

July/August 2009

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